SUBMIT second issue of #nof!ckingborderwall

SUBMIT second issue of #nof!ckingborderwall

For the second issue of #nof!ckingborderwall, we are seeking submissions from Xicanx, Chicanx, afro-Mexican, indigenous and other people of color with connections to the Texas/Mexico and Texas/California borderlands area who are writers, poets, brujxs and artists who face multiple marginalizations. We are looking for stories, poems, hybrid pieces, photo narratives and art (fotos or artwork) that captures the essence of Border culture and what the creation of the Border wall destroys.

You don’t have to live in the Mexico/Texas or Califas/Mexico border to submit, but be connected to the area, border wall and borderlands in your life.

We’re happy that you’re considering submitting your work to us.

Submissions and questions should be sent to poemsandnumbers@gmail.com

 

Poems & Numbers is an online space that publishes women and nonbinary persons of color, who face multiple marginalization including being disabled (crip), neurodiversity, queer and marginalized genders. We want to receive work by queer, nb, trans, immigrant mujeres, by first gen latinx and by sex workers, by faith healers and brujas, by those who the border crossed and those from displaced islands and lands. For so long have our poems and odd posts have not found homes, our anger deemed inappropriate and not fitting a certain style.  We wanted to provide that platform.

We will consider simultaneous submissions, but ask that you notify us immediately if you are accepted elsewhere. We do not reprint written work that has been published elsewhere, in any form.

Allow at least 8 weeks for a response. Feel free to email us if this time period has passed.

 

Guidelines

Poetry/art and Collages

⇒Send 5 pieces as your submission. If your photo narrative essay is more than 3-4 images, that would count as one submission. We encourage you to submit five poems/entries instead of one.

⇒If you are sending collages, send them as high-quality attachments, along with their titles and an artist statement in a document. For accessibility to people who use screen readers, who are blind, who have visual processing disorders and/or low vision,  you will be asked to also submit a short description of your pieces. It’s up to you on how in depth you would like to describe your artwork. For example, noting race, skin color, eye color can be of importance when noting white supremacy in popular culture or dominant culture or if the image header or art piece features a person of color.  Here’s a short article on how to write descriptions to make images accessible to people who are blind.

⇒ Submissions should be in 10 or 12 standard font, such as Time New Roman.

⇒Poems & Numbers will not make any editorial or formatting changes without contributor’s approval. You will retain the right to review the final draft of their work prior to publication.

⇒With regards to the republication of your piece, we ask that you contact us if/when such a case arises, such as a chapbook or an anthology, and credit Poems & Numbers as the work’s first publisher.

⇒Include a brief cover letter in your attachment. In your email include a short bio of 100 words and any links, homepage, social media, etc.

⇒No previously published work for this issue. This includes zines, blogs, or Tumblr posts. If your piece has been published elsewhere, either in print or online, please do not submit it.

⇒By submitting your work you confirm that the work submitted is original and you are the sole creator.

⇒If you are using a pen name that is meant to convey a person of a different, marginalized group such as a person of color when you are not a person of color, don’t do it. We’d get angry and throw a twitter tantrum. Don’t submit to us using a pen name that is meant to “sound” like a person of color if you are a white person.

⇒Writers accepted for publication grant Poems and Numbers Serial Rights. Following publication, all rights revert back to you.
⇒If your work is selected, you give us permission to share your work, name & bio on our site and social media.

⇒ wait one year from resubmitting if you have published with us before.

⇒By submitting your work you confirm that the work submitted is original and you are the sole creator.

⇒If you are using a pen name that is meant to convey a person of a different, marginalized group such as a person of color when you are not a person of color, don’t do it. We’d get angry and throw a twitter tantrum. Don’t submit to us using a pen name that is meant to “sound” like a person of color if you are a white person.

⇒If your work is selected, you give us permission to share your work, name & bio on our site and social media.

Artwork/visual work: Our visual submission process is different. If your work has been published elsewhere and you retain the rights, we’d love to receive your subs.

⇒Payment: Contributors receive an honorarium of 10 USD.

Deadline: Nov. 15th

⇒Questions should be sent to poemsandnumbers@gmail.com

⇒Donations: Donations let us pay a small honorarium to the artists and writers featured at Poems & Numbers.  We want to be able to pay all the writers of future editions as well as the editors and assistants.

⇒Donations can be made to poemsandnumbers [at]gmail.com




⇔If you would like to support us with time, editorial work, volunteering, social media, outreach, reach out to us at hermanresistpress (at)gmail.com. We do not charge reading fees. Everyone involved does this as a labor of love and because we believe the work we do is important.

 


Poems & Numbers is an online space that publishes mujeres, nonbinary folks and those who face class+race multiple marginalization including crip, neurodiversity and disabilities.

Marginalization is a multi-layered concept. Here we seek to address and give space to those who have overlapping marginalized aspects in our lives. While some litmags and other spaces address sexism or single issue or varied activism, we want to address the concerns of the most marginalized of these groups, and how they intersect in our identities, and in doing so call attention to and address how other establishments fail to adequately center the most marginalized voices.  Often it is helpful to stress what we are not because of the way we are marginalized. But here, we want to stress <em>us</em>, who we are and why we congregate and not name the power dynamics we want to break from.